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How to Become an Anthropologist

Have you thought about becoming an anthropologist? This is an exciting career that can bring you to many parts of the world. You’ll learn how to research, teach and support the need for such studies. Students in this career field are very enthusiastic about their studies and generally fair very well.

 

Are you familiar with what anthropology is? Well, it’s all about studying human behavior. This covers a wide range of areas such as culture, social relations, human biology, evolution, languages, music and architecture. You can study how human behavior changes over time, how people migrate, how specific races of human evolve and how they function in their own cultural settings. Your coursework will teach you research methodology, generating and testing hypotheses and producing data for analysis.

 

As an anthropologist, you will probably specialize in a particular geographic area such as Africa, British Isles, Eastern Europe, South America or perhaps Latin America. You’ll often specialize in a particular population of humans in those areas and look at things like death or marriage rituals. Perhaps you will study humans that live in high altitudes or in rain forests and determine how this has affected them genetically and health wise. Perhaps you are interested in plant remains of food stocks that ancient people used in their diets or tools that they made and how they used them.

 

You’ll need to have a high school diploma and passed a college entrance exam such as SAT/ACT. This will allow you to apply to an undergraduate degree program (4 years) in anthropology. If you wish, you can continue to the master’s level (2 more years) and if you have the stamina you can continue into a Ph.D. program (8 years). The higher you go in your education the better your job opportunities will be. If you like, you can start with a bachelor’s degree and stop and gain field experience and when you’re ready continue to graduate work. It’s a good idea to have as much experience in the field before you try to enter a graduate program.   With a graduate degree, you can work in fields such as medicine, epidemiology, public health, linguistics, cognitive psychology, social services and neuroscience. This gives you quite a bit of latitude in terms of employment possibilities.

 

As an undergraduate, you’ll want to take courses that encompass a wide range of areas including business courses, technical training, cultural and biological history, fine arts and foreign languages. You need to be well rounded and knowledgeable about as many things as you can. That’s what makes this career field so exciting. You’ll learn how to lean about other people and how their communities function. If you decide to go to the master’s level, you’ll learn how to combine these perspectives and begin problem solving. Since there are so many areas to get into, make sure you get an idea of what you want to do as soon as possible so you can finish your education as soon as possible and get a job. If you’re having problems deciding, talk to your teachers and possibly people in the field so that you can make a decision.

 

More recently, a number of jobs have come available to the student who has a bachelor’s degree in anthropology. This may just be the ticket for you if you don’t want to extend your educational stay. You can work for contract archaeology firms at various archaeological sites, labs and museums.

 

Because of the broad background that an anthropological program has to offer, you have a wide range of career niches that are shared by other social scientists. This opens employment doors with corporations, government, nonprofit organizations, various trades and businesses. Your unique training will allow you to compete for these jobs providing for better job opportunities and areas of interest.

Leigh Connelly

Leigh Connelly

Leigh Has been online publishing since 2001. His interest included self development, new technology’s and travel.
Leigh Connelly

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